AuthaGraph World Maps

Authagraph Countries Map

The AuthaGraph projection was invented in 1999 by Japanese architect Hajime Narukawa, and is one of the most innovative approaches to mapping today. The projection largely preserves the relative area of landmasses and oceans, limits the distortion of their shapes, and avoids cutting continents in half. And unlike it’s irregularly-shaped predecessor, the Dymaxian map, the AuthaGraph can fit neatly into a rectangle.

Authagraph Projection Reverse

Perhaps most interestingly, the AuthaGraph projection reflects the spherical nature of Earth in that there are no dead ends. Below you can see the AuthaGraph expanded to show an infinite perspective of the world.

Authagraph Infinite

AuthaGraph maps can be reconfigured to make any point on the globe the center of the map. Here is an AuthaGraph map centered on Southern Africa.

Authagraph Africa

And here we see the world from South America, a region that rarely enjoys the privilege of being mapped at the center.

Authagraph South America

Here’s another view of the world, centered on Europe.

AuthaGraph Europe

This is how the world looks from the North Pole with the AuthaGraph.

Authagraph North Pole

And from the South Pole with this triangular Antarctica-centered AuthaGraph map.

Authagraph Antarctica

 

For more information, visit www.AuthaGraph.com

World Map in Cherokee

 

CherokeeWorldMap
ᎡᎶᎯ (Earth) in ᏣᎳᎩ (Cherokee), by Jordan Engel

ᏓᎶᏂᎦᏍᏛ – Asia
ᎬᎿᎦᏍᏛ – Africa
ᏧᏴᏢ ᎠᎹᏰᏟ – North America
ᏧᎦᎾᏮ ᎠᎹᏰᏟ – South America
ᏧᏁᏍᏓᎸ – Antarctica
ᏳᎳᏛ – Europe
ᎡᎳᏗᏜ – Australia
ᎢᏤᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎦᏙᎯ – Greenland
ᏭᏕᎵᏴ ᎠᎺᏉᎯ – Pacific Ocean
ᏗᎧᎸᎬ ᎠᎺᏉᎯ – Atlantic Ocean
ᎠᏴᏫᏯ ᎠᎺᏉᎯ – Indian Ocean
ᎤᎦᎾᏭ ᎢᏗᏢ ᎠᎺᏉᎯ – Southern Ocean
ᏧᏴᏢ ᎠᎺᏉᎯ.- Arctic Ocean

Blank Maps – Make Your Own!

Do you have an idea for a map that you want to share with the world? Now is your chance. We hope that these maps will help to facilitate participatory mapping – cartography which represents the agenda of the community by depicting local knowledge and information. Rotate the map to fit your preferred orientation. Add any features you want. If you want to, send your maps back to us at decolonialatlas@gmail.com so we can see what you did!

These maps depict only the coastlines of the world. Other than that, they are blank slates. No countries. No artificial borders. They use the Eckert IV projection, which was created in 1906 by Max Eckert. Aside from being known as the founder of cartography as an academic discipline, Eckert was unfortunately also a Nazi supporter. The Eckert IV is an equal-area projection which is widely used for thematic maps of the world because it distorts the polar regions less than other equal-area projections, such as the famous Gall-Peters projection.

Eckert IV Atlantic

Eckert IV projection with the central meridian set at 0° (Atlantic-centered)

Eckert IV Pacific

Eckert IV projection with the central meridian set at 155° (Pacific-centered)

Origins of Agricultural Crops

Origins and primary regions of diversity of agricultural crops

“The recovery of the people is tied to recovery of food, since food itself is medicine—not only for the body but also for the soul and the spiritual connection to history, ancestors, and the land.” Winona LaDuke

This map highlights regions where crops were initially domesticated and evolved over long periods of time, and where the diversity of traditional crop varieties and related wild plants is especially high.

Decolonizing our diets is a process of healing our bodies through reclaiming our indigenous foodways. We must recover our ancestors’ wisdom before it’s gone forever. What foods did they eat? How was food prepared? What herbs and plants did they use for medicine? How did they conduct their ceremonies? Despite colonial suppression, indigenous foodways have survived in the daily acts of resistance that include story telling, recipe sharing, ceremony, and the planting and preserving of heirloom seeds.

Source:
http://blog.ciat.cgiar.org/origin-of-crops/

Territories of Uncontacted Tribes

 

Uncontacted peoples are communities who live without significant contact with globalized civilization, most often by choice. Although we commonly call them ‘uncontacted,’ a more accurate description is probably ‘voluntarily isolated’ or ‘withdrawn’ or ‘evasive.’ They live in the Amazon Rainforest, the island of New Guinea, and on India’s North Sentinel Island. Survival International reports that about one hundred groups around the world prefer to be left alone. Knowledge of the existence of these groups comes mostly from encounters with neighboring tribes and from aerial footage.

These maps won’t help anyone make ‘first contact’. But they will help to stop oil companies and loggers from invading the lands of uncontacted tribes. These maps show the territories of uncontacted tribes around the world. The territories are typically thousands of square kilometres in size, and the locations are deliberately approximate. No one should go to tribes which aren’t in regular contact with outsiders. It’s dangerous for everyone.

Learn more about the work being done to protect the tribes and their land by Survival International.

Source: http://www.uncontactedtribes.org/where

Uncontacted World

The approximate locations of uncontacted tribes around the world.

Uncontacted South America.png

The approximate locations of uncontacted tribes in South America.

Uncontacted New Guinea

The approximate locations of uncontacted tribes in New Guinea.