The Border / La Frontera

 

The Border La Frontera

“We Didn’t Cross the Border. The Border Crossed Us. No Cruzamos la Frontera. La Frontera nos Cruzaba.” Map by Jordan Engel.

For the native nations living along the US-Mexico border, the border is a barbed wire fence through their living room. Over the course of generations, they’ve formed connections on both sides of the border, and yet they’re considered foreigners and illegal immigrants in their ancestral homelands. In the O’odham language, there is no word for “state citizenship.” No human being is illegal.

In this map, the territories of the Kumeyaay, Cocopah, Quechan, Tohono O’odham, Yaqui, Tigua, and Kickapoo are shown straddling the 2,000 mile border, with the red dots along the border representing official border crossings.

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Para los pueblos indígenas que viven por la frontera entre los Estados Unidos y México, la frontera es una pared en medio de su sala. Por generaciones, han formado conexiones en los dos lados de la frontera, y sin embargo se los consideran extranjeros y inmigrantes ilegales en su propia patria. En la lengua O’odham, no hay una palabra para “ciudadanía estatal”. Ningún ser humano es ilegal.

En este mapa, los puntos rojos representan los cruces fronterizos oficiales. Muestra los territorios de los Kumiai, Cucapá, Quechan, Tohono O’odham, Yaqui, Tigua, y Kikapú.

Lakota Territory

lakota-country

This map shows Lakota Territory as defined by the 1851 Treaty of Fort Laramie between the United States government and the Lakota in relation to the rest of North America, or Khéya Wíta, meaning “Turtle Island” in Lakota.

Khéya Wíta – North America (Turtle Island)
Osní Makȟóčhe – Alaska (Cold Land)
Uŋčíyapi Makȟóčhe – Canada (Grandmother’s [Queen Victoria’s] Land)
Lakȟóta Makȟóčhe – Lakota Country (Lakota’s Land)
Mílahaŋska Tȟamákȟočhe‎ – The United States of America (Long Knives’ Land)
Spaóla Makȟóčhe‎ – Mexico (Mexican’s Land)
Tȟuŋkášila Othí – Washington DC (Grandfather [The President] Dwelling)
Spaóla Otȟúŋwahe – Mexico City (Mexican’s City)

* Note on the compass – South is oriented at the top, a Lakota custom according to Dakȟóta Tȟaté from the Standing Rock Reservation. In this medicine wheel, North is represented as white. This is how Darrell Red Cloud, an Oglala Lakota friend of mine, designates the colors on the wheel, but he says that other medicine men may do it differently.

Map by Jordan Engel

US Household Carbon Footprint

average-annual-household-carbon-footprint-by-zip-code
average-annual-household-carbon-footprint-by-zip-code-east-coast

How much CO2 does the average household in your community produce? See the interactive carbon footprint map from CoolClimate.

While population density contributes to relatively low household carbon footprint in the central cities of large metropolitan areas, the more extensive suburbanization in these regions contributes to an overall net increase in household carbon footprint compared to smaller metropolitan areas. Suburbs alone account for 50% of total U.S. household carbon footprint.

Source: UC Berkeley CoolClimate Network, Average Annual Household Carbon Footprint (2013).

Dakota Access Pipeline Indigenous Protest Map

Dakota Access Pipeline.jpg

The Dakota Access Pipeline is a 1,134 mile long crude oil pipeline currently under construction from North Dakota to Illinois. Lakota and Dakota activists have established the Sacred Stone Camp in the path of the pipeline to halt its construction, drawing thousands of supporters from tribes across the continent.

This map shows the area around the Sacred Stone Camp with the proposed pipeline route, labelled with Lakota/Dakota place names and oriented to the South.

Map by Jordan Engel with assistance by Dakota Wind, thefirstscout.blogspot.com.

Íŋyaŋwakağapi Wakpá – Cannonball River “Stone-Make-For-Themselves River.”
Íŋyaŋ Wakháŋagapi Othí – Sacred Stone Camp / Cannon Ball, North Dakota
“Sacred Stone Camp.”
Íŋyaŋ Woslál Háŋ – Standing Rock Reservation.
Mníšoše – Missouri River “Turbulent Water.”
Pȟá Šuŋg Wakpána – Horsehead Creek “Horse Head Creek.”
Zuzéča Sápa – Dakota Access Pipeline “Black Snake.”

Thunder Bay

Thunder Bay Keith Catton 2016

“Thunder Bay” by Keith Catton

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Detail of “Thunder Bay”

k.catt anekiwajiw

Detail of “Thunder Bay”

Thank you to Keith Catton for creating this beautiful map of Thunder Bay, Ontario, labelled in Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe). See the artist’s statement below:

The creation of this work originally began as a hand drawn trail map of the “Mountain McKay”; where I grew up. Just as I was about to write in the Mountain’s name with India ink, my hand stopped- I encountered a dilemma in my project. For it was not my intent to propagate place names of Colonial history with my art. Names like McKay (a fur trader) and Loch Lomond (named after a lake in Scotland). Its is important for me to honour my hometown history and the original people of Thunder Bay, the Anishinaabe, while also creating art which inspires critical thought. I was in search of the oldest names that I could find. I spent days riffling through collections of French maps from the 1600’s. “Kaministiqua”; was always present, signifying its importance in fur trade history. It seemed I had hit a wall at that early point, just like my ink, the trail ran dry.

I began searching through books and reading local history. Eventually I happened upon a research paper that a famous local librarian wrote and published in 1921, later reprinted in the collection Life in a Thundering Bay (2007). It just happens the library I frequented during my childhood was named after her. Mary J. L. Black, of The Thunder Bay Historical Society, published Place Names in the Vicinity of Fort William (1921). Black was equally inquisitive about local History as she had interviewed a number of individuals on the place names including translations and stories. The Ojibway language was of the oral tradition and thus numerous names and spellings existed for each location. Around that time a friend at Waverly Library showed me an Ojibway Dictionary from the 1800s by Frederic Baraga, which I then used to cross reference Ms. Black’s paper. I followed a pattern using the oldest names but the contemporary spelling for Anemki. The original names either described the landscape or described a spiritual belief attached to the location. For example, the choice of using “Thunder Point” over “Thunder Cape”, for when consulting the map the landform points toward Thunder Mountain. This was one of the great revelations I had during my research.

The art was drawn with calligraphy pens and ink. The prints are then created by silkscreen and each print completed with hand water-coloring. The visual style is reminiscent of the past, a conceptual decision meant to in a sense amend time. I present this map not as the singular description. But as a medium to hopefully spark further conversation and curiosity in the community consciousness.

Keith Catton
2016

http://slantedfallingsunlight.blogspot.ca/2016/04/thunder-bay.html

 

Anemki Wikwed ~ Thunder Bay, Bay of Thunder
Animosaigaigun ~ Dog Lake
Animiki Neiashi ~ Thunder Point
Kakabeka ~ “high cliff falls”
Kaministiquia ~ “river that winds”
Kasasagadadjiqegamishkag ~ “the high lake that is always overflowing”
Anemki Wajiw ~ Thunder Mountain
Kitchi Gami ~ Great Water, Great Lake

 

Inuit Cartography

InuitCartography.jpg

In Kalaallit Nunaat (Greenland), the Inuit people are known for carving portable maps out of driftwood to be used while navigating coastal waters. These pieces, which are small enough to be carried in a mitten, represent coastlines in a continuous line, up one side of the wood and down the other. The maps are compact, buoyant, and can be read in the dark.

These three wooden maps show the journey from Sermiligaaq to Kangertittivatsiaq, on Greenland’s East Coast. The map to the right shows the islands along the coast, while the map in the middle shows the mainland and is read from one side of the block around to the other. The map to the left shows the peninsula between the Sermiligaaq and Kangertivartikajik fjords.

Source: Topografisk Atlas Grønland