AuthaGraph World Maps

Authagraph Countries Map

The AuthaGraph projection was invented in 1999 by Japanese architect Hajime Narukawa, and is one of the most innovative approaches to mapping today. The projection largely preserves the relative area of landmasses and oceans, limits the distortion of their shapes, and avoids cutting continents in half. And unlike it’s irregularly-shaped predecessor, the Dymaxian map, the AuthaGraph can fit neatly into a rectangle.

Authagraph Projection Reverse

Perhaps most interestingly, the AuthaGraph projection reflects the spherical nature of Earth in that there are no dead ends. Below you can see the AuthaGraph expanded to show an infinite perspective of the world.

Authagraph Infinite

AuthaGraph maps can be reconfigured to make any point on the globe the center of the map. Here is an AuthaGraph map centered on Southern Africa.

Authagraph Africa

And here we see the world from South America, a region that rarely enjoys the privilege of being mapped at the center.

Authagraph South America

Here’s another view of the world, centered on Europe.

AuthaGraph Europe

This is how the world looks from the North Pole with the AuthaGraph.

Authagraph North Pole

And from the South Pole with this triangular Antarctica-centered AuthaGraph map.

Authagraph Antarctica

 

For more information, visit www.AuthaGraph.com

Lakota Territory

lakota-country

This map shows Lakota Territory as defined by the 1851 Treaty of Fort Laramie between the United States government and the Lakota in relation to the rest of North America, or Khéya Wíta, meaning “Turtle Island” in Lakota.

Khéya Wíta – North America (Turtle Island)
Osní Makȟóčhe – Alaska (Cold Land)
Uŋčíyapi Makȟóčhe – Canada (Grandmother’s [Queen Victoria’s] Land)
Lakȟóta Makȟóčhe – Lakota Country (Lakota’s Land)
Mílahaŋska Tȟamákȟočhe‎ – The United States of America (Long Knives’ Land)
Spaóla Makȟóčhe‎ – Mexico (Mexican’s Land)
Tȟuŋkášila Othí – Washington DC (Grandfather [The President] Dwelling)
Spaóla Otȟúŋwahe – Mexico City (Mexican’s City)

* Note on the compass – South is oriented at the top, a Lakota custom according to Dakȟóta Tȟaté from the Standing Rock Reservation. In this medicine wheel, North is represented as white. This is how Darrell Red Cloud, an Oglala Lakota friend of mine, designates the colors on the wheel, but he says that other medicine men may do it differently.

Map by Jordan Engel

Dakota Access Pipeline Indigenous Protest Map

Dakota Access Pipeline.jpg

The Dakota Access Pipeline is a 1,134 mile long crude oil pipeline currently under construction from North Dakota to Illinois. Lakota and Dakota activists have established the Sacred Stone Camp in the path of the pipeline to halt its construction, drawing thousands of supporters from tribes across the continent.

This map shows the area around the Sacred Stone Camp with the proposed pipeline route, labelled with Lakota/Dakota place names and oriented to the South.

Map by Jordan Engel with assistance by Dakota Wind, thefirstscout.blogspot.com.

Íŋyaŋwakağapi Wakpá – Cannonball River “Stone-Make-For-Themselves River.”
Íŋyaŋ Wakháŋagapi Othí – Sacred Stone Camp / Cannon Ball, North Dakota
“Sacred Stone Camp.”
Íŋyaŋ Woslál Háŋ – Standing Rock Reservation.
Mníšoše – Missouri River “Turbulent Water.”
Pȟá Šuŋg Wakpána – Horsehead Creek “Horse Head Creek.”
Zuzéča Sápa – Dakota Access Pipeline “Black Snake.”

East African Ground Maps

Sabatele's Map of the Main Caravan Routes in East Africa

Sabatele’s map of the main caravan routes in East Africa. Paper and pencil. This map with its southerly orientation traces the main caravan routes across Tanzania, with the terminus points placed at Dar es Salaam. Size of the original: unknown. Current location: unknown. Photograph courtesy of the Archiv Museum fur Volkerkunde za Leipzig (Neg. Af 0 1428; from the originial glass plate negative).

The scene of Africans drawing ground maps to the profound surprise of Europeans is a recurring theme of the exploration literature. The German geographer Karl Weule was “overwhelmed” by the number of maps members of his caravan produced during a six-month research expedition through German East Africa in 1906. Between marches, he supplied his carriers with paper and pencils to see what they would draw. This is the map made by a Mambwe man named Sabatele, originally from the southern shore of Lake Tanganyika near the present Tanzania-Zambia border. The map, which traces caravan routes across Tanzania, was made in Lindi at the very beginning of Weule’s expedition. Weule notes that Sabatele’s map was oriented with south at the top, but he turned it around 180 degrees “in order to bring it into agreement with our maps.”

Source: The History of Cartography, Volume 2, Book 3: Cartography in Prehistoric, Ancient, and Medieval Europe and the Mediterranean. Edited by David Woodward and G. Malcolm Lewis ©1998

Locations on this map:
1. “Mawopanda,” Dar es Salaam
2. “Lufu,” the Ruvu River, a large river frequently crossed on the main caravan road by Wanyamwezi carriers, one of whom created this map
3. “Mulokolo,” Morogoro, the terminus for the central railway at the time
4. “Mgata,” Makata, plain between the Uluguru and Rubeho mountains, a swamp during the rainy season
5. “Kirosa,” Kilosa
6. “Balabala,” the caravan road
7. “Mwapwa,” Mpwapwa, the old caravan center, once the last stop on the inland march before the great alkali desert, Marenga Mkali, and hostile Ogogo
8. Mutiwe, a stream near Kilimatinde
9. Kilimatinde, a mountain
10. Kasanga
11. Kondoa-Irangi
12. Post of Kalama, in Iramba (Mkalama?)
13a. “Tobola,” Tabora, with the new boma (enclosure/fort)
13b. “Tobola ya zamani,” Old Tabora with the former boma
14. Ujiji on Lake Tanganyika
15. Mwanza on Lake Victoria

Inuit Cartography

InuitCartography.jpg

In Kalaallit Nunaat (Greenland), the Inuit people are known for carving portable maps out of driftwood to be used while navigating coastal waters. These pieces, which are small enough to be carried in a mitten, represent coastlines in a continuous line, up one side of the wood and down the other. The maps are compact, buoyant, and can be read in the dark.

These three wooden maps show the journey from Sermiligaaq to Kangertittivatsiaq, on Greenland’s East Coast. The map to the right shows the islands along the coast, while the map in the middle shows the mainland and is read from one side of the block around to the other. The map to the left shows the peninsula between the Sermiligaaq and Kangertivartikajik fjords.

Source: Topografisk Atlas Grønland

Aboriginal Australia

AboriginalAustralia

This map indicates the general location of larger groupings of Aboriginal Australians and Torres Strait Islanders, which may include smaller groups such as clans, dialects, or individual languages in a group.

Major locations on the map are listed below.

English place name – Indigenous place name (Indigenous language)

Adelaide – Tarndanya (Kaurna)
Alice Springs – Mparntwe (Arrernte)
Brisbane – Meanjin (Turrbal)
Cairns – Gimuy (Yidiny)
Canberra – Kamberra (Ngunnawal)
Darwin – Garrmalang (Larrakia)
Melbourne – Narrm (Bunwurrung)
Melville Island – Yermalner (Tiwi)
Perth – Boorloo (Noongar)
Sydney – Warrang (Dharug)
Tasmania – lutruwita (palawa kani) *note that palawa kani names do not capitalize the first letter

Endonyms of Africa

AfricaEndonyms

Endonyms of Africa. Map by Jordan Engel

The map of Africa that most of us know today was drawn during the era of European colonialism – from the borders which divided the continent, to the erasure of indigenous place names.

This map seeks to remedy colonial cartography by erasing the borders, orienting to the South (in the tradition of 11th century Amaziɣ cartographer Muhammad al-Idrisi), and labeling locations in their predominant native language.

Below, you’ll find a list of all locations on this map:

Abidjan – Abidjan (Ebrié)

Accra – Nkran (Akan)
Addis Ababa – አዲስ አበባ / Addis Abäba (አማርኛ [Amharic], “new flower”)
Alexandria – الإسكندرية / al-Iskandariyyah (العربية [Arabic])
Algiers – ⴷⵣⴰⵢⵜ (ⵜⴰⵎⴰⵣⵉⵖⵜ [Berber])
Antananarivo – Antananarivo (Malagasy)
Atlas Mountains – ⵉⴷⵓⵔⴰⵔ ⵏ ⵡⴰⵟⵍⴰⵚ / Idurar n Waṭlaṣ (ⵜⴰⵎⴰⵣⵉⵖⵜ [Berber])
Cairo – القاهرة‎ / al-Qāhirah (العربية [Arabic])
Canary Islands – ⴽⴰⵏⴰⵔⵉⴰ / Kanaria (ⵜⴰⵎⴰⵣⵉⵖⵜ [Berber])
Cape Town – //Hui !Gaeb (Khoekhoegowab [Khoekhoe], “where the clouds gather”)
Casablanca – ⴰⵏⴼⴰ / Anfa (ⵜⴰⵎⴰⵣⵉⵖⵜ [Berber])
Comoro Islands – Komori (Shikomori [Comorian])
Conakry – Kɔnakiri (Sosoxui [Susu], “other bank”)
Dakar – Ndakaaru (Wolof)
Dar es Salaam – Dar es Salaam (Kiswahili [Swahili])
Drakensberg – uKhahlamba (isiZulu [Zulu], “barrier of up-pointed spears”)
Durban – iTheku (isiZulu [Zulu], “bay/lagoon”)
Harare – Harare (ChiShona [Shona])
Hoggar Mountains – ⵉⴷⵓⵔⴰⵔ ⵏ ⴰⵀⴰⴳⴳⴰⵔ / Idurar n Ahaggar (ⵜⴰⵎⴰⵣⵉⵖⵜ [Berber])
Horn of Africa – Geeska Afrika (Af-Soomaali [Somali])
Johannesburg – iGoli (isiZulu [Zulu])
Kalahari Desert – Kgalagadi (Tswana, “a waterless place”)
Kampala – Kampala (Oluganda [Luganda])
Kano – Kano (Hausa)
Kinshasa – Kinsásá (Lingála [Lingala])
Khartoum – الخرطوم / al-Kharṭūm (Arabic)
Lagos – Èkó (Yoruba)
Lake Chad – Sádǝ (Kanuri)
Lake Malawi – Nyanja ya Malawi (Chi-Chewa [Chewa])
Lake Tanganyika – Ikiyaga Tanganyika (Kirundi)
Lake Turkana: Anam Ka’alakol (Ng’aturk(w)ana [Turkana])
Lake Victoria – Nalubaale (Oluganda [Luganda])
Luanda – Lwanda (Kimbundu)
Lusaka – Lusaka (Chi-Chewa [Chewa])
Madagascar – Madagasikara (Malagasy)
Maputo – iMaputo (SiSwati [Swati])
Mogadishu – Muqdisho (Af-Soomaali [Somali])
Mount Cameroon – Mongo ma Ndemi (Kpwe, “mountain of greatness”)
Mount Kenya – Kĩrĩnyaga (Gĩkũyũ [Kikuyu], “where God Lives”)
Mount Kilimanjaro – Ol Doinyo Oibor (ɔl Maa [Maasai], “mountain which is white”)
Nairobi – Enkare Nairobi (ɔl Maa [Massai], “Place of cool waters”)
Namib Desert – Namib (Nama, “vast place”)
Niamey – Niamey (Zarma)
Ras Dashen – ራስ ደጀን / Rās Dejen (አማርኛ [Amharic], “head guard”)
Sahara Desert – ⵜⵉⵏⴰⵔⵉⵓⴻⵏ / Tinariwen (ⵜⴰⵎⴰⵣⵉⵖⵜ [Berber], “the deserts”)
Sinai Peninsula – سينا / Sīna (العربية [Arabic])
Thabana Ntlenyana – Thabana Ntlenyana (Sesotho [Sotho], “beautiful little mountain”)
Toubkal – ⵜⵓⴱⵇⴰⵍ / Tubqal (ⵜⴰⵎⴰⵣⵉⵖⵜ [Berber])
Tripoli – – ⵟⵔⴰⴱⵍⵙ / Ṭrables (ⵜⴰⵎⴰⵣⵉⵖⵜ [Berber])
Zanzibar Island – Unguja (Kiswahili [Swahili])