US Household Carbon Footprint


How much CO2 does the average household in your community produce? See the interactive carbon footprint map from CoolClimate.

While population density contributes to relatively low household carbon footprint in the central cities of large metropolitan areas, the more extensive suburbanization in these regions contributes to an overall net increase in household carbon footprint compared to smaller metropolitan areas. Suburbs alone account for 50% of total U.S. household carbon footprint.

Source: UC Berkeley CoolClimate Network, Average Annual Household Carbon Footprint (2013).

Dakota Access Pipeline Indigenous Protest Map

Dakota Access Pipeline.jpg

The Dakota Access Pipeline is a 1,134 mile long crude oil pipeline currently under construction from North Dakota to Illinois. Lakota and Dakota activists have established the Sacred Stone Camp in the path of the pipeline to halt its construction, drawing thousands of supporters from tribes across the continent.

This map shows the area around the Sacred Stone Camp with the proposed pipeline route, labelled with Lakota/Dakota place names and oriented to the South.

Map by Jordan Engel with assistance by Dakota Wind,

Íŋyaŋwakağapi Wakpá – Cannonball River “Stone-Make-For-Themselves River.”
Íŋyaŋ Wakháŋagapi Othí – Sacred Stone Camp / Cannon Ball, North Dakota
“Sacred Stone Camp.”
Íŋyaŋ Woslál Háŋ – Standing Rock Reservation.
Mníšoše – Missouri River “Turbulent Water.”
Pȟá Šuŋg Wakpána – Horsehead Creek “Horse Head Creek.”
Zuzéča Sápa – Dakota Access Pipeline “Black Snake.”

World Map in Cherokee


ᎡᎶᎯ (Earth) in ᏣᎳᎩ (Cherokee), by Jordan Engel

ᎬᎿᎦᏍᏛ – Africa
ᏧᏴᏢ ᎠᎹᏰᏟ – North America
ᏧᎦᎾᏮ ᎠᎹᏰᏟ – South America
ᏧᏁᏍᏓᎸ – Antarctica
ᏳᎳᏛ – Europe
ᎡᎳᏗᏜ – Australia
ᎢᏤᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎦᏙᎯ – Greenland
ᏭᏕᎵᏴ ᎠᎺᏉᎯ – Pacific Ocean
ᏗᎧᎸᎬ ᎠᎺᏉᎯ – Atlantic Ocean
ᎠᏴᏫᏯ ᎠᎺᏉᎯ – Indian Ocean
ᎤᎦᎾᏭ ᎢᏗᏢ ᎠᎺᏉᎯ – Southern Ocean
ᏧᏴᏢ ᎠᎺᏉᎯ.- Arctic Ocean

Blank Maps – Make Your Own!

Do you have an idea for a map that you want to share with the world? Now is your chance. We hope that these maps will help to facilitate participatory mapping – cartography which represents the agenda of the community by depicting local knowledge and information. Rotate the map to fit your preferred orientation. Add any features you want. If you want to, send your maps back to us at so we can see what you did!

These maps depict only the coastlines of the world. Other than that, they are blank slates. No countries. No artificial borders. They use the Eckert IV projection, which was created in 1906 by Max Eckert. Aside from being known as the founder of cartography as an academic discipline, Eckert was unfortunately also a Nazi supporter. The Eckert IV is an equal-area projection which is widely used for thematic maps of the world because it distorts the polar regions less than other equal-area projections, such as the famous Gall-Peters projection.

Eckert IV Atlantic

Eckert IV projection with the central meridian set at 0° (Atlantic-centered)

Eckert IV Pacific

Eckert IV projection with the central meridian set at 155° (Pacific-centered)