Dakota Access Pipeline Indigenous Protest Map

Dakota Access Pipeline.jpg

The Dakota Access Pipeline is a 1,134 mile long crude oil pipeline currently under construction from North Dakota to Illinois. Lakota and Dakota activists have established the Sacred Stone Camp in the path of the pipeline to halt its construction, drawing thousands of supporters from tribes across the continent.

This map shows the area around the Sacred Stone Camp with the proposed pipeline route, labelled with Lakota/Dakota place names and oriented to the South.

Map by Jordan Engel with assistance by Dakota Wind, thefirstscout.blogspot.com.

Íŋyaŋwakağapi Wakpá – Cannonball River “Stone-Make-For-Themselves River.”
Íŋyaŋ Wakháŋagapi Othí – Sacred Stone Camp / Cannon Ball, North Dakota
“Sacred Stone Camp.”
Íŋyaŋ Woslál Háŋ – Standing Rock Reservation.
Mníšoše – Missouri River “Turbulent Water.”
Pȟá Šuŋg Wakpána – Horsehead Creek “Horse Head Creek.”
Zuzéča Sápa – Dakota Access Pipeline “Black Snake.”

World Map in Cherokee

 

CherokeeWorldMap
ᎡᎶᎯ (Earth) in ᏣᎳᎩ (Cherokee), by Jordan Engel

ᏓᎶᏂᎦᏍᏛ – Asia
ᎬᎿᎦᏍᏛ – Africa
ᏧᏴᏢ ᎠᎹᏰᏟ – North America
ᏧᎦᎾᏮ ᎠᎹᏰᏟ – South America
ᏧᏁᏍᏓᎸ – Antarctica
ᏳᎳᏛ – Europe
ᎡᎳᏗᏜ – Australia
ᎢᏤᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎦᏙᎯ – Greenland
ᏭᏕᎵᏴ ᎠᎺᏉᎯ – Pacific Ocean
ᏗᎧᎸᎬ ᎠᎺᏉᎯ – Atlantic Ocean
ᎠᏴᏫᏯ ᎠᎺᏉᎯ – Indian Ocean
ᎤᎦᎾᏭ ᎢᏗᏢ ᎠᎺᏉᎯ – Southern Ocean
ᏧᏴᏢ ᎠᎺᏉᎯ.- Arctic Ocean

Blank Maps – Make Your Own!

Do you have an idea for a map that you want to share with the world? Now is your chance. We hope that these maps will help to facilitate participatory mapping – cartography which represents the agenda of the community by depicting local knowledge and information. Rotate the map to fit your preferred orientation. Add any features you want. If you want to, send your maps back to us at decolonialatlas@gmail.com so we can see what you did!

These maps depict only the coastlines of the world. Other than that, they are blank slates. No countries. No artificial borders. They use the Eckert IV projection, which was created in 1906 by Max Eckert. Aside from being known as the founder of cartography as an academic discipline, Eckert was unfortunately also a Nazi supporter. The Eckert IV is an equal-area projection which is widely used for thematic maps of the world because it distorts the polar regions less than other equal-area projections, such as the famous Gall-Peters projection.

Eckert IV Atlantic

Eckert IV projection with the central meridian set at 0° (Atlantic-centered)

Eckert IV Pacific

Eckert IV projection with the central meridian set at 155° (Pacific-centered)

Origins of Agricultural Crops

Origins and primary regions of diversity of agricultural crops

“The recovery of the people is tied to recovery of food, since food itself is medicine—not only for the body but also for the soul and the spiritual connection to history, ancestors, and the land.” Winona LaDuke

This map highlights regions where crops were initially domesticated and evolved over long periods of time, and where the diversity of traditional crop varieties and related wild plants is especially high.

Decolonizing our diets is a process of healing our bodies through reclaiming our indigenous foodways. We must recover our ancestors’ wisdom before it’s gone forever. What foods did they eat? How was food prepared? What herbs and plants did they use for medicine? How did they conduct their ceremonies? Despite colonial suppression, indigenous foodways have survived in the daily acts of resistance that include story telling, recipe sharing, ceremony, and the planting and preserving of heirloom seeds.

Source:
http://blog.ciat.cgiar.org/origin-of-crops/

East African Ground Maps

Sabatele's Map of the Main Caravan Routes in East Africa

Sabatele’s map of the main caravan routes in East Africa. Paper and pencil. This map with its southerly orientation traces the main caravan routes across Tanzania, with the terminus points placed at Dar es Salaam. Size of the original: unknown. Current location: unknown. Photograph courtesy of the Archiv Museum fur Volkerkunde za Leipzig (Neg. Af 0 1428; from the originial glass plate negative).

The scene of Africans drawing ground maps to the profound surprise of Europeans is a recurring theme of the exploration literature. The German geographer Karl Weule was “overwhelmed” by the number of maps members of his caravan produced during a six-month research expedition through German East Africa in 1906. Between marches, he supplied his carriers with paper and pencils to see what they would draw. This is the map made by a Mambwe man named Sabatele, originally from the southern shore of Lake Tanganyika near the present Tanzania-Zambia border. The map, which traces caravan routes across Tanzania, was made in Lindi at the very beginning of Weule’s expedition. Weule notes that Sabatele’s map was oriented with south at the top, but he turned it around 180 degrees “in order to bring it into agreement with our maps.”

Source: The History of Cartography, Volume 2, Book 3: Cartography in Prehistoric, Ancient, and Medieval Europe and the Mediterranean. Edited by David Woodward and G. Malcolm Lewis ©1998

Locations on this map:
1. “Mawopanda,” Dar es Salaam
2. “Lufu,” the Ruvu River, a large river frequently crossed on the main caravan road by Wanyamwezi carriers, one of whom created this map
3. “Mulokolo,” Morogoro, the terminus for the central railway at the time
4. “Mgata,” Makata, plain between the Uluguru and Rubeho mountains, a swamp during the rainy season
5. “Kirosa,” Kilosa
6. “Balabala,” the caravan road
7. “Mwapwa,” Mpwapwa, the old caravan center, once the last stop on the inland march before the great alkali desert, Marenga Mkali, and hostile Ogogo
8. Mutiwe, a stream near Kilimatinde
9. Kilimatinde, a mountain
10. Kasanga
11. Kondoa-Irangi
12. Post of Kalama, in Iramba (Mkalama?)
13a. “Tobola,” Tabora, with the new boma (enclosure/fort)
13b. “Tobola ya zamani,” Old Tabora with the former boma
14. Ujiji on Lake Tanganyika
15. Mwanza on Lake Victoria