AuthaGraph World Maps

Authagraph Countries Map

The AuthaGraph projection was invented in 1999 by Japanese architect Hajime Narukawa, and is one of the most innovative approaches to mapping today. The projection largely preserves the relative area of landmasses and oceans, limits the distortion of their shapes, and avoids cutting continents in half. And unlike it’s irregularly-shaped predecessor, the Dymaxian map, the AuthaGraph can fit neatly into a rectangle.

Authagraph Projection Reverse

Perhaps most interestingly, the AuthaGraph projection reflects the spherical nature of Earth in that there are no dead ends. Below you can see the AuthaGraph expanded to show an infinite perspective of the world.

Authagraph Infinite

AuthaGraph maps can be reconfigured to make any point on the globe the center of the map. Here is an AuthaGraph map centered on Southern Africa.

Authagraph Africa

And here we see the world from South America, a region that rarely enjoys the privilege of being mapped at the center.

Authagraph South America

Here’s another view of the world, centered on Europe.

AuthaGraph Europe

This is how the world looks from the North Pole with the AuthaGraph.

Authagraph North Pole

And from the South Pole with this triangular Antarctica-centered AuthaGraph map.

Authagraph Antarctica

 

For more information, visit www.AuthaGraph.com

World Map in Cherokee

 

CherokeeWorldMap
ᎡᎶᎯ (Earth) in ᏣᎳᎩ (Cherokee), by Jordan Engel

ᏓᎶᏂᎦᏍᏛ – Asia
ᎬᎿᎦᏍᏛ – Africa
ᏧᏴᏢ ᎠᎹᏰᏟ – North America
ᏧᎦᎾᏮ ᎠᎹᏰᏟ – South America
ᏧᏁᏍᏓᎸ – Antarctica
ᏳᎳᏛ – Europe
ᎡᎳᏗᏜ – Australia
ᎢᏤᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎦᏙᎯ – Greenland
ᏭᏕᎵᏴ ᎠᎺᏉᎯ – Pacific Ocean
ᏗᎧᎸᎬ ᎠᎺᏉᎯ – Atlantic Ocean
ᎠᏴᏫᏯ ᎠᎺᏉᎯ – Indian Ocean
ᎤᎦᎾᏭ ᎢᏗᏢ ᎠᎺᏉᎯ – Southern Ocean
ᏧᏴᏢ ᎠᎺᏉᎯ.- Arctic Ocean

Blank Maps – Make Your Own!

Do you have an idea for a map that you want to share with the world? Now is your chance. We hope that these maps will help to facilitate participatory mapping – cartography which represents the agenda of the community by depicting local knowledge and information. Rotate the map to fit your preferred orientation. Add any features you want. If you want to, send your maps back to us at decolonialatlas@gmail.com so we can see what you did!

These maps depict only the coastlines of the world. Other than that, they are blank slates. No countries. No artificial borders. They use the Eckert IV projection, which was created in 1906 by Max Eckert. Aside from being known as the founder of cartography as an academic discipline, Eckert was unfortunately also a Nazi supporter. The Eckert IV is an equal-area projection which is widely used for thematic maps of the world because it distorts the polar regions less than other equal-area projections, such as the famous Gall-Peters projection.

Eckert IV Atlantic

Eckert IV projection with the central meridian set at 0° (Atlantic-centered)

Eckert IV Pacific

Eckert IV projection with the central meridian set at 155° (Pacific-centered)

Inuit Cartography

InuitCartography.jpg

In Kalaallit Nunaat (Greenland), the Inuit people are known for carving portable maps out of driftwood to be used while navigating coastal waters. These pieces, which are small enough to be carried in a mitten, represent coastlines in a continuous line, up one side of the wood and down the other. The maps are compact, buoyant, and can be read in the dark.

These three wooden maps show the journey from Sermiligaaq to Kangertittivatsiaq, on Greenland’s East Coast. The map to the right shows the islands along the coast, while the map in the middle shows the mainland and is read from one side of the block around to the other. The map to the left shows the peninsula between the Sermiligaaq and Kangertivartikajik fjords.

Source: Topografisk Atlas Grønland

World Population

World Population, by Bill Rankin

World Population, by Bill Rankin

This map, created by Bill Rankin, shows the human population density around the world. It is an equal-area projection, and centers on the Pacific, rather than the Atlantic. It makes plain sense that the two largest population centers on Earth, South Asia and East Asia, should be at the center of a global population map.

In the map below was taken from Wikipedia. Aside from being less visually nice, East Asia appears on the periphery of the map, and is much smaller than it really is relative to other landmasses, which consequently diminishes its importance in global issues.

worldpop

Check out this map and many others made by Bill at http://www.radicalcartography.net/

Actual European Discoveries

Actual European Discoveries by Bill Rankin

Actual European Discoveries by Bill Rankin

“Every Columbus Day, we’re reminded of the difference between discovery and “discovery” — and rightly so. But let’s not sell Europe short; after all, European explorers found plenty of diminutive islands that no human had ever seen before, along with extravagant amounts of ice and snow. Just the islands alone add up to more than 0.14% of the world’s total land area, and today they’re home to more people than live in all of Connecticut!

All sarcasm aside, it’s worth remembering that almost everywhere Europeans went, they were met by existing inhabitants. Even in the vast Pacific and the barren Arctic, only a few isolated coasts were truly terra nullius. (Indeed, this map particularly underscores the maritime expertise of Pacific Islanders. Unlike the islands of the Atlantic and Indian Oceans, nearly all of the Pacific was settled by the 14th century.)

This map also shows the changing geopolitics of exploration. For example, it shows at a glance how the Treaty of Tordesillas split the 16th-century world between the Portuguese and the Spanish; it also shows the dominance of the British in Australasia and south of the Antarctic Convergence. Contrast this with the seemingly random color patterns in the Arctic, Pacific, and southern Indian Oceans, where aggressive whaling often led to a free-for-all of destructive competition.”

– Bill Rankin, 2013

Check out this map and many others at http://www.radicalcartography.net/