Peak Oil by Country

Year of Peak Oil Production by Country

Year of Peak Oil Production by Country

Peak oil is the point in time when the maximum rate of extraction of petroleum is reached, after which the rate of production is expected to enter terminal decline. There is a general consensus between industry leaders and analysts that world oil production has/will peak between 2010 and 2030. Many oil producing countries have already experienced peak oil.

This map shows which countries have peaked and which have yet to peak. It shows the estimated years of peak oil production for the top 25 oil producing countries in the world today.

Map by Jordan Engel
Source: http://www.globalshift.co.uk/peakdates.html

Red Sky’s Migration Chart

Red Sky's Migration Chart

Red Sky’s Migration Chart

Red Sky's Migration Chart

Red Sky’s Migration Chart With Annotations.

Red Sky's Migration Chart With Geographical Interpretation

Red Sky’s Migration Chart With Geographical Interpretation

A wiigwaasabak is a birch scroll, sewn together with cedar roots, used ceremonially by Ojibwe medicine men. They use geometric diagrams to explain many complex things and have been handed down for generations. This particular 2.6-meter long wiigwaasabak was made by Eshkwaykeeshik (James Red Sky). It recounts the historical journey of the Ojibwe people from their home along the Zhiiwitaagani-gichigami (Atlantic Ocean) to the Nayaano-nibiimaang Gichigamiin (Great Lakes) which occurred in the 14th and 15th centuries.

“After the Great Manito ot God had created all creatures on earth, he found they were dying off and decided he needed to get them to worship him, but he didn’t know how so he called a meeting of all the birds and all the creatures on earth to talk about it ‘somewhere across the Big Water, where this Manito was.’
The Manito needed someone to take his message to the people and asked who would do it. The Bear was there and said, ‘I’ll take it across to the people.’ The Bear went off with the message of Everlasting Life, but it was very heavy to carry and he could hardly walk. When he came to a wall, he couldn’t get through it at first until he stuck his tongue out, which made a hole that he could get through. He did this each time he came to a wall, and the four wind manitos stationed at each of the cardinal directions thanked him for the work he did. He came upon four walls before he finally got through to Midewegun or Mide lodge.
The Bear had successfully carried the Pack of Life thus far when he met Megis, the shell, who took over the trek down the St. Lawrence River to Montreal, past the Lachine Rapids to Mattawa, on down the French River to Lake Huron, through the Straits of Mackinac to Sault Ste. Marie.
Somewhere along this stretch of the journey the Megis transferred the Pack of Life to the Otter, who carried it along the south shore of Lake Superior to the Keeweenaw Peninsula, on to LaPointe in Wisconsin, breaking through a sand bar at Fond du Lac at the west end of Lake Superior and travelling up the St. Louis River westward to Leech Lake.”

~ Eshkwaykeeshik (James Red Sky)

Sources:
https://decolonialatlas.files.wordpress.com/2015/05/d0305-redskymigrationchart2.jpg

http://territories.indigenousknowledge.org/static/files/assets/a3bf958c/image28.gif

http://museumofojibwaculture.net/exhibits.html

Eora Map of Sydney Harbour

Aboriginal Clans and Place Names of Sydney Harbour, Compiled by Jeremy Steele

Aboriginal Clans and Place Names of Sydney Harbour, Compiled by Jeremy Steele

Prior to the arrival of the first fleet of 1,300 British convicts, guards, and administrators in January, 1788, Sydney Harbour was the homeland of the the Eora people. The Eora generally identify with three main clans – the Gadigal / Cadigal (purple), the Wangal (green), and the Gamaragal / Cammeraygal (yellow).

“Place Names of the original inhabitants as records by William Dawes, ‘Anon’, the Science of Man, J.H. Watson, Tyrell, James Meehan’s Map 1807, Macquarie Aboriginal Words and other sources. The names have been re-spelt consistently, to approximate what they might have sounded like. Two spelling are given where the original sources strongly diverse. Alternative names are also given where the original sources do not agree. Compiled by Jeremy Steele, May 2003”

Source: http://naabawinya.blogspot.com/2012/09/sydney-clan-boundaries-cadigal-and_27.html

Indigenous Names for Mount McKinley

Indigenous names for Mount McKinley

Indigenous names for Mount McKinley

For years, activists have attempted to officially change the name of North America’s highest mountain from Mount McKinley to Denali. The naming dispute is one of the most prominent cases of re-indigenizing toponymy in the United States. Indigenous names for the mountain can be found in at least seven different indigenous languages. The names fall into two categories. To the south of the Alaska Range in the Dena’ina and Ahtna languages the mountain is known by names which translate as ‘big mountain’. To the north of the Alaska Range in the Lower Tanana, Koyukon, Upper Kuskokwim, Holikachuk, and Deg Xinag languages the mountain is known by names which translate as ‘the high one’.

Welikia 1609

This series of maps come from the Welikia Project (formerly known as the Mannahatta Project) – a project of the Wildlife Conservation Society to rediscover the ecology of the New York City area from before colonization. – www.welikia.org

Above: Mannahatta circa 1609. Below: Southern Manhattan today.

Above: Mannahatta circa 1609. Below: Southern Manhattan today.

Left: Mannahatta circa 1609. Right: Southern Manhattan today.

Left: Mannahatta circa 1609. Right: Southern Manhattan today.

Welikia (Lenape for "My good home") looking East, circa 1609.

Welikia (Lenape for “My good home”) looking East, circa 1609.

Mannahatta looking North, circa 1609.

Mannahatta looking North, circa 1609.