St. Louis in Ojibwe

Biiganaki-ziibiing (St. Louis, Missouri) in Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe), by Jordan Engel

Biiganaki-ziibiing (St. Louis, Missouri) in Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe), by Jordan Engel

A big thanks to Charles Lippert for supplying the following Anishinaabemowin place names:

Biiganaki-ziibiing: St. Louis, MO (By the Blackfoot River)
Aasamadinaansing-waakaa’igan: St. Charles, MO (Fort on the Little Sloping Hill)
Agaaming: East St. Louis, IL (On the Other Shore)
Mitigwaki-ziibiwishenying: Wood River, IL (Forest River)
Misi-ziibi: Mississippi River (Great River)
Biiganaki-ziibi: Missouri River (Blackfoot River)
Ininwewi-ziibi: Illinois River (River of the Illini [Plain Speakers])
Maanamego-ziibi: Meramec River (Catfish River)
Ikagookaawi-ziibi: Cahokia Creek (River of the Cahokia [Abundant with Geese])
Waawaabamowi-ziibiins: Silver Creek (Looking-glass Little River)
Gete-biskitigweyaang: Horseshoe Lake (The Old River Bend)
Zhedeg-minis: Pelican Island (Pelican Island)

St. Louis in the Fox Language

Pekonoki (St. Louis, MO) in Meshkwahkihaki (Fox), by Jordan Engel

Pekonoki (St. Louis, Missouri) in Meshkwahkihaki (Fox), by Jordan Engel

Pekonoki – Saint Louis, Missouri (On the Blackfeet)

Mäse’sibowi – The Mississippi River

Pikihtanwi – The Missouri River

“Mesquakie or Fox (from the native form Meshkwahkihaki, Red Earth People) is one of the names given to the language shared bay the Sac (also called Sauk, native form Asakiwaki ) and Fox people. These Algonquian speaking peoples lived by Lake Michigan, but were later displaced. Now they live in reservations in Iowa, the Kansas-Nebraska border and central Oklahoma. There were 673 speakers in the census of 1990, in a population of some 3,000 people.” – http://www.oocities.org/geonative/ojibwe.html

Chicago in Myaamia

Šikaakonki (Chicago, Illinois) in Myaamia (Miami-Illinois), by Jordan Engel

Šikaakonki (Chicago, Illinois) in Myaamia (Miami-Illinois), by Jordan Engel

Šikaakonki – Chicago, Illinois

Šikaakwa Siipiiwi – The Chicago River

Kihcikami – Lake Michigan

“Šikaakwa Siipiiwi in the Myaamia name for the Chicago River.  It was named for the abundance of Allium tricoccum (wild leek) which grew along its banks.  In the 1600s, the French called this plant “wild garlic” and for this reason, sometimes the river is mistakenly called the “Wild Garlic River.”  For more on this place name see Michael McCafferty, “A Fresh Look at the Place Name Chicago,” Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, 96, no. 2 (Summer 2003), 116-29.  Other tribes have similar names for the river and the place, though they have different stories explaining the origin of the name.  While linguists and historians might be able to determine ultimate origins of the name, we do not believe that our understanding excludes alternate perspectives.” – myaamiahistory.wordpress.com

To learn more about the Myaamia language and culture, visit myaamiacenter.org and myaamiahistory.wordpress.com

County Clare in Irish

Contae an Chláir (County Clare, Ireland) in Gaeilge (Irish) by Jordan Engel

Contae an Chláir (County Clare, Ireland) in Gaeilge (Irish) by Jordan Engel

Last week, Contae an Chláir native Seosamh Mac Ionnrachtaigh asked if I would help create a map in Gaeilge for him. He graciously worked with me to supply the many Gaeilge place names that appear on this map and help me understand the language and the geography better. For instance, the name “Shannon” has many different manifestations in this map – a river, a town, an airport, and an estuary, and each one is slightly different – tSionainn, Sionainne, and Sionnain. Seosamh explained that in Gaeilge, when two nouns come together, the second noun is in the genitive case, and that the letter ‘T’ comes before a feminine noun starting with ‘S’ in most cases in Gaeilge.

– Jordan